powes-parkop

11,000 to be evicted

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By CLIFFORD FAIPARIK
NATIONAL Capital District Governor Powes Parkop yesterday confirmed that the eviction of about 11,000 people from the Morata settlement was for the construction of a road in Port Moresby.
Parkop said that a private developer got a court order to evict the settlers.
“It was a private developer who got out the court order and not the NCD,” he said.
However,   Morata New Block Community and Welfare Association chairman Romny Tengere said the eviction notice given verbally to the settlers to vacate the piece of land, Portion 2733, was highly suspicious.
Tengere claimed that a magistrate’s decision to verbally evict the settlers from that land sounded like that the magistrate must have read the defence files that contained documents from the Lands Department.
“More than 11,0000 settlers have been given until tomorrow (Wednesday) to move out of their settlement.  If they were to be evicted, most of the workforce in public service and private sector would be affected because most of them are residing in this settlement,” Tengere said.
Meanwhile, a local company that deals with land consultancy, building constructions, assessment plans and property management and valuations, is looking at developing the Morata settlement into a modern suburb. Kingdom Estate and Associates was given the approval and consent by the Morata Ward 10 council ward members and leaders were appointed by Parkop.
Managing director Elizah Psalmson Ulg said they were waiting for the NCD physical planning board to declare a subdivision process to begin work on portion 1571, known as Mosquito Street.
The area has more than 5,000 people.
Ulg thanked councillor Jonathan Afuti and  community leaders for having confidence in the company.
“We want to develop this parcel of land into a modern residential suburb, in line with plans of the NCD physical planning board and its chairman, Parkop,” Ulg had said earlier this year.
“We have a plan to create commercial, industrial and recreational spaces, have a Southern Cross water tank, build aid posts, roads, churches and standard houses.”
“That’s in line with the governor’s vision to transform settlements into suburbs. We are happy to be an implementing partner of NCDC.”
Ulg said NCDC was subdividing and surveying settlements and giving titles to settlers who had lived in a particular area for more than 12 years.
”People want a suburb where they can sleep in better houses, where they can access all vital government services,” he said.

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