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WHY are there so many provincial flags being flown around instead of the Papua New Guinea flag around this time? It’s not a provincial day celebrations, it is PNG celebrating 41 years of being a nation. Put aside our provincial identity and let’s be proud Papua New Guineans and fly the red, yellow and black flag.
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NOTHING wrong with flying your provincial flag but let the colour red, yellow and black dominate and fly it high with the provincial flags below it.
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AND maybe it’s time provincial days are clearly marked on the calendars and public holiday declared in the province when it is their day. Then those who reside outside their province can use that opportunity to fly their respective provincial flags wherever they are and take part in activities organised to mark this day.
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WHILE the vendors are bringing the products right to almost everyone’s door step, it definitely is getting dangerous especially at traffic lights junctions where they are literally dodging between vehicles with their sales.
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IF the universe is assumed to contain an infinite number of uniformly distributed luminous stars, then every point in the sky should be as bright as a star. So why is the sky dark at night? That is the question posed by Olbers’s paradox, named for astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers, who described it in 1823, more than 200 years after Johannes Kepler first posed the question as an argument against the notion of a limitless universe with infinite stars.
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ELIZABETH Barrett’s Poems, published in 1844, brought her immediate fame and became a favourite of the poet Robert Browning. The two began to correspond, fell in love, and, after a courtship kept secret from her tyrannical father, married and settled in Italy. The once frail and sickly Elizabeth grew stronger and, at age 43, gave birth to a son. Her poetic reputation rests chiefly on the love poems written during their courtship, Sonnets from the Portuguese.
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AT the Botamochi Temple in Kamakura, Japan, Festival of St. Nichiren’s Pardonhonors St. Nichiren (1222-1282), considered to be Japan’s most fervent Buddhist priest. He was exiled to the island of Sado in the Sea of Japan in 1271. After four years there, he returned and spent the rest of his life on Mount Minobu. The Festival of Nichiren’s Pardon is observed by members of the Nichiren sect with massive demonstrations and the loud chanting of prayers attributed to Nichiren, accompanied by the beating of drums. People make offerings of botamochi, rice balls covered with sweet bean paste, in his honour.
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QUOTE of the day: Quiet people have the loudest minds. – Stephen Hawking
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