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Cash transfer
It is the seventh week of being unemployed and the family breadwinner has used up all his savings. He is now spending endless hours figuring out how to transfer the money in his head to his bank account. A headache.
No compliance
Public transport operators will pay a fine of K1,000 if they breach the rules on the number of passengers they are allowed to carry. But little has been done to enforce the rule. Some buses during the rush hour carry more than 15 – without even batting an eyelid.
No protection
Not much has been said about what people should do when receiving or handing out money to someone else such as in a taxis, buses and shops when there are no hand sanitisers available.
Glad to be back
Cecilia Kendino is among vendors at the Boroko market back selling items to earn money. She sells local tobacco (brus) for between 50t to K5. She is happy that she is allowed to earn a living at the market. The informal economy is currently worth around K12 billion a year in PNG. Go Cecilia.
Loans sharks
Some loans sharks too have been badly affected by the lockdown. They too want loans. Most of their clients in the low and middle income bracket are out of work.
In Pakistan
Imran Khan and the Pakistan government have found a unique solution to keep people employed by paying them 500 rupees a day (about K10) to plant trees. The plan is to plant 10 billion trees this year.
Food for thought
Take a minute to remember what really matters to you and why.
Best quote
“How do you expect your congregation members or church followers to listen and follow your good preaching from the Holy Bible when you yourself the Shepherd is not leading the sheep correctly and in a proper manner?” – Chief Justice Sir Gibbs Salika while convicting a pastor for misappropriating K200,000.

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