Good governance a must for PNG

Letters

IT is both interesting and frightening to hear and read what is transpiring in our country concerning pressing social and political issues.
I am neither for the Government nor the Opposition, but on behalf of the silent majority.
I want to discuss some ideas on the direction they should be taking concerning the justice and governance of this nation.
The concept of governance is not new. It is as old as civilisation.
Simply put, governance means the process of decision-making and the process by which decisions are implemented.
An analysis of governance focuses on the formal/informal actors involved in decision-making and its implementation as well as the formal/informal structures that have been set in place to arrive at and implement a decision.
All actors apart from the government and the military are grouped together as part of civil society.
In some countries, in addition to civil society, organised crime syndicates also influence decision-making, particularly in urban areas and at the national level.
Similarly, formal government structures are the means by which decisions are arrived at and implemented.
At the national level, informal decision-making structures, such as “kitchen cabinets” or informal advisers may exist.
In urban areas, organised syndicates such as the land mafia may influence decision-making, or even local powerful families in some rural areas, which often results in corrupt practices.
Good governance has eight major characteristics – follows the rule of law, is participatory, is transparent, is responsive, is consensus-orientated, is equitable and inclusive, is effective and efficient, and is accountable.
It should be clear that good governance is an ideal which is difficult to achieve in its totality.
Very few countries and societies have come close to achieving good governance in its totality.
The challenge is very simple: are our MPs following the eight major characteristics of good governance?

Eric Mumson Piuk
Gerehu Stage 4
POM

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