Roads and bridges vital

Letters

IN the remote areas of Papua New Guinea, roads and bridges are vital links that connect a community and gives locals access to goods and services such as community health posts medical supplies and school materials for students.
The deteriorating roads and run down bridges affects contractors’ supply of goods to people in remote places.
The more the delay in distributing medical supplies, the more lives are in danger.
Without proper facilities available as well as medication, community health officers are under pressure and this also results in the deteriorating condition of sick patients condition which could end in death.
I refer to minor diseases that can be treated but due to bad roads and delays in supplies, the disease becomes more serious even deadly.
People living in the remote areas are facing real struggles.
Most pregnant mothers either loose their lives or their child during labour as there are no proper facilities available.
Patients with serious conditions cannot be transferred to urban hospitals to seek proper treatments due to deteriorating roads and bridges. These hindrances make life tougher to our people living in the remote areas.
The local level government must align with its respective districts administrators and the provincial administrators to seriously discuss this issue of deteriorating roads and bridges conditions that has become a hindrance.
You (LLG) are the voice of your people and you have the power to raise such issues up to the right people at the executive level.
The Government believes in service delivery, and I appeal to all the new LLGs that will be on board soon across PNG by make it become your duty to continue submitting your proposals to issues such as roads and bridges infrastructure development.
For communities to live in peace and harmony, these issues must be dealt with so the National Government services can reach our people at the remote areas.
Let’s not pretend to the global communities that our economy is stabilise or our revenue is stabilise when our people living in remote areas are facing the real life struggles for survival.
Let’s not continue be a pretenders. We must deliver what our remote communities need.

Winus Komba,
LAE

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